Strawberry and Peach Lambic Sorbet

Strawberry and Peach Lambic Sorbet 2

The first of several beer flavored ice creams.

I went a little crazy this weekend. A little beer crazy, to be exact. See, ever since I decided that my October project was going to be desserts and baking with beer, I can’t stop thinking about it. Every time I go on the internet and see a new dessert recipe – mousse, pie, custard – I wonder, “can I beer that up?”

This weekend, it was beer ice cream. On Friday night, rather than going out and braving the rain, I stayed in and made batch after batch of beer ice cream. Let me tell you, there are few better ways to spend a Friday.

Based on the comments on my last beer baking post - Guinness Oreos - I decided to try to make a sorbet using Lindeman’s Pêche lambic, which I chose purely because one of my friends in college was forever drinking Lindeman’s lambic beers (and because it was available at the Whole Foods near my work). My original idea was to pair the peach lambic with a peach puree, but, since peaches are entirely out of season, I couldn’t find any. I thought at least I’d be able to find some peaches from Chile (therefore committing a deep crime of unseasonal dessert making), but I couldn’t even find those. So I committed a different crime of unseasonality, and paired the peach lambic with strawberries (from California) instead.

I was worried that having too great proportion of beer to fruit would prevent the sorbet from freezing, but the final product was a little weak on the beer and strong on the strawberries. Part of this, I think, was my choice of beer – the Lindeman’s peach lambic is very sweet and very mild – too mild, I think.  The other problem was the strawberries – I think if I had used peaches it would have brought out the lambic’s flavor more. Instead, the strawberries overwhelmed the lambic – it tasted mostly like a regular strawberry sorbet.

My question for all you beer lovers out there is this: do you have any good lambic suggestions for a re-do of this sorbet? As I’m a beer novice, I’d love your help.

Also, because I know some of you are thinking it – it wasn’t until I had done all my shopping and was safely at home on Friday that I realized I should have just made a sorbet with hard cider. There are great hard ciders out there, and I could have mixed it with a non-alcoholic cider to make a lovely sorbet. If only I had thought of that before I started shopping. Oh well. Maybe next weekend.

Peach Lambic and Strawberry Sorbet 1

Not perfect, but not bad either.

Strawberry and Peach Lambic Sorbet
Adapted from The Perfect Scoop: Ice Creams, Sorbets, Granitas, and Sweet Accompaniments by David Lebovitz. Copyright 2007. Published by Ten Speed Press. Found via Yum Sugar.

Ingredients
1.5 pounds fresh strawberries, rinsed, hulled, and finely chopped
3/4 cup (150 g) sugar
1 cup peach lambic
Juice of one lime

http://www.yumsugar.com/314723

Makes approximately 1 quart.

In a medium bowl, mix together strawberries and sugar. Let sit for an hour, until sugar is dissolved. Puree in a blender or food processor – or, if you are me, mash with a potato masher until as smooth as possible. Strain through a fine mesh sieve into another medium bowl, mashing down the solids with a spatula to get as much as the juice through as possible. Add lambic and lime to the strawberry mixture. Chill in the refrigerator for several hours ntil cool, before freezing in an ice cream maker according to manufacturers instructions.

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7 Comments »

  1. Alice said

    Lambic drinking friend? Who would that be?

    My favorite Lindeman’s lambic is the Framboise. The Kriek and Pomme just don’t excite me (neither does the Peche). Maybe try that with raspberries? You could also try cooking it down so the flavor is strong and the alcohol content is lower (and thus less likely to slow the freezing). I would loooove to try that sorbet.

    • moderndomestic said

      Hahahah! I have very fond memories of drinking lambic with you on at the Vox Box and playing with cats.

      I actually went with the peach for monetary reasons – raspberries were $4 a pint at the grocery store, and I needed at least two pints of them to make my sorbet. I thought that peaches would be a cheaper purchase (this was before I hit up three grocery stores and didn’t find any). But that’s a good tip . . . maybe if they go on sale. Yeah, I think cooking the lambic down may be the way to go. The Peche is just so . . . mild. It really doesn’t taste like anything.

  2. Alice stole my suggestion- the raspberry lambics often have a much stronger flavor.

    The sorbet was delicious- this would be fabulous in the summer. I liked how it cleansed my pallet between the other two not yet unveiled beer ice creams! Thank you for letting me taste test!

  3. Phil said

    I’ve only had the Framboise, so I’m not sure how the other flavors compare. The sorbet seemed to be more refreshing than usual because of the carbonation, but maybe that was just me. Thanks again for the samples. It was great to finally confirm that your cooking tastes as good as it looks!

  4. Paula said

    Hi, I’m new here (great blog!).
    Unfortunately I don’t have a suggestion for a re-do, but since you into beer based desserts – have you tried the chocolate Guinnes cake? I love it :))

  5. […] second batch of beer ice cream, after the peach and strawberry lambic sorbet, revisited the chocolate/stout flavors I used in the Guinness Oreos. But this time I took my […]

  6. quinnsi said

    I’d have to say that if you’re looking for a pure fruit experience, then lindeman’s is the way to go. Most lambics are much much more sour than Lindeman’s. They also tend to me quite expensive. That said, you may be able to pick up some Fouders cerise, or southern tier cherry saison, which may work well for you.

    Good Luck!

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